About Golden Globe Awards

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Beginning in January 1944, the 87 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association conferred the Golden Globe Awards, which recognize excellence in both American and foreign cinema and television.

The annual ceremony at which the awards are awarded takes place in January and is a prominent component of the film industry’s awards season, which culminates with the Academy Awards each year.

Although the 78th Golden Globe Awards made an exemption to this criterion owing to the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on film, the eligibility period for the Golden Globes corresponds to the calendar year (from January 1 to December 31).

History

The Hollywood International Press Association (HFPA) was created in 1943 by a group of foreign journalists stationed in Los Angeles who wanted to create a more structured system for collecting and transmitting film news to markets outside of the United States.

One of the organization’s initial main projects was to create a cinematic awards event akin to the Academy Awards.

The first Golden Globe Awards were awarded in January 1944 at the 20th Century-Fox studios, celebrating the outstanding accomplishments in 1943 filmmaking. Throughout the following decade, further ceremonies were conducted at different locations, including the Beverly Hills Hotel and the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

The HFPA developed a unique honorary award in 1950 to commemorate those who have made significant contributions to the entertainment business. The inaugural prize was given to filmmaker and producer Cecil B. DeMille, who was recognized as a worldwide figure in the entertainment business. As a result, the honor was renamed the Cecil B. DeMille Award. [5]

The inaugural Golden Globe in Television Achievement was presented during the 13th Golden Globe Awards in February 1956. Best TV Series, Best TV Actor, and Best TV Actress were the first three permanent television award categories, which debuted at the 19th Golden Globe Awards in March 1962.

The awards were first presented in 1963 by one or more people known as “Miss Golden Globe,” a designation that was renamed “Golden Globe Ambassador” on January 5, 2018. The post was usually held by the daughters or occasionally boys of a celebrity, and it was sometimes fought among famous parents as a source of pride. [6]

The Golden Globe statuette was redesigned in 2009. (but not for the first time in its history). For a year, the HFPA and the New York firm Society Awards cooperated to create a statuette that incorporated a unique marble and improved the statuette’s quality and gold content. Prior to the performance, it was presented in a press conference at the Beverly Hilton.

The Carol Burnett Award, named after its inaugural winner in 2019, actress and comedian Carol Burnett, was developed as a television equivalent to the Cecil B. DeMille Award.

The HFPA has been able to contribute millions of dollars to entertainment-related organizations, as well as sponsor scholarships and other initiatives for future film and television professionals, thanks to the proceeds from the annual event. The Young Artist Awards, presented annually by the Young Artist Foundation, were founded in 1978 by Maureen Dragone, a member of the Hollywood Foreign Press, to recognize and award excellence in young Hollywood performers under the age of 21 and to provide scholarships for young artists who may be physically or financially challenged.

Rules

Eligibility

The calendar year, from January 1 to December 31, is the qualifying eligibility period for all nominations.

All of the film and television acting categories exclude voice-over performances and cameo appearances in which people portray themselves.

Films must be at least 70 minutes long and have a minimum of a seven-day run in the Greater Los Angeles region, beginning before December 31. Films may be seen in cinemas, via pay-per-view, or delivered digitally.

Films do not have to be distributed in the United States to be eligible for the Best Foreign Language Film category. At least 51% of the dialogue must be in a language other than English, and they must be published in their nation of origin 14 months previous to the Academy Awards, from November 1 to December 31. If a film was censored in its country of origin, it may still qualify if it was released in the United States for one week within the qualifying calendar year. There is no restriction to the number of films that may be submitted from a single nation.

A television show must broadcast in the United States between the hours of 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. during prime time (or 7 p.m. and 11 p.m on Sundays). A program may air on broadcast television, basic or premium cable, or digital distribution; however, if it is exclusively available on pay-per-view or through digital film delivery, it does not qualify. A TV program must also be produced in the United States or be a financial and creative co-production between an American and a foreign production firm. Reality programs and non-scripted shows are also excluded.

A film cannot be submitted in both the film and television categories; instead, it should be included in the media in which it was first released. It may be put into the TV categories if it was initially broadcast on American television. It should be included in the film categories if it was released in cinemas or on pay-per-view. A film festival screening does not invalidate a program that would otherwise be shown on television.

During the qualifying calendar year, actors in a TV series must appear in at least six episodes. Actors in a TV movie or miniseries must appear at least 5% of the time in that movie or miniseries.

Screening requirements

Active HFPA members must be invited personally by the distributor or publicist to an official screening of each qualifying film. The screening must take place in the Greater Los Angeles region, either before to or up to one week following the film’s premiere.

It does not have to be an HFPA member-only event; it might be a standard public showing in a theater or a press screening. In order to avoid scheduling problems with other approved screenings, the screening must also be cleared by the Motion Picture Association of America.

For TV shows, all that is required is that they are accessible to HFPA members in any standard format, including the original TV broadcast.

Nominations and voting

The HFPA must receive entry forms for films within ten days of the official screening. Before the deadline, TV shows should be submitted “as soon as feasible.”

Active HFPA members will cover press conferences and interview cast members of chosen films and television series as part of their usual journalistic duties. The film press conferences must take place either before or up to one week after the film’s release in the Greater Los Angeles region.

In November, HFPA members get ballots for the nominations, as well as a “Reminder List” of qualifying films and television shows.

Each HFPA member then ranks their top five selections in each category from 5 to 1, with 5 being their favorite pick. The five picks that garner the most votes in each category become the nominees in that category. Only ranked voting is used to break ties, with the number 5 worth 5 points, the number 4 worth 4, and so on.

The final ballots are sent to HFPA members after the nominees are revealed in mid-December.

The winner in each category is chosen by a plurality vote from among the candidates. In the event of a tie, the nominee with the most votes on the nomination ballot is declared the winner.

Categories

Motion picture awards

  • Best Motion Picture – Drama: since 1943 (separated genre in 1951)
  • Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: since 1951
  • Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language: since 1948
  • Best Motion Picture – Animated: since 2006
  • Best Director – Motion Picture: since 1943
  • Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama: since 1943 (separated genre in 1951)
  • Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: since 1951
  • Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama: since 1943 (separated genre in 1951)
  • Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: since 1951
  • Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture: since 1943
  • Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture: since 1943
  • Best Screenplay – Motion Picture: since 1947
  • Best Original Score – Motion Picture: since 1947
  • Best Original Song – Motion Picture: since 1961
  • Cecil B. DeMille Award for Lifetime Achievement in Motion Pictures: since 1951

Television awards

  • Best Television Series – Drama: since 1961
  • Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy: since 1961
  • Best Miniseries or Motion Picture – Television: since 1971
  • Best Actor in a Television Series – Drama: since 1961
  • Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy: since 1961
  • Best Actor in a Miniseries or Motion Picture – Television: since 1981
  • Best Actress in a Television Series – Drama: since 1961
  • Best Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy: since 1961
  • Best Actress in a Miniseries or Motion Picture – Television: since 1981
  • Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television: since 1970
  • Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television: since 1970
  • Carol Burnett Award for Lifetime Achievement in Television: since 2018
  • Retired awards
  • Best Documentary • Awarded from 1972 to 1976
  • Best English-Language Foreign Motion Picture • Awarded from 1957 to 1973
  • New Star of the Year – Actor • Awarded from 1948 to 1983
  • New Star of the Year – Actress • Awarded from 1948 to 1983
  • Henrietta Award (World Film Favorite – Female) • Awarded from 1950 to 1979[36]
  • Henrietta Award (World Film Favorite – Male) • Awarded from 1950 to 1979
  • Promoting International Understanding • Awarded from 1945 to 1964[37]
  • Best Cinematography – Motion Picture • Awarded from 1948 to 1953, in 1955 and in 1963.
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