End times is here: Here’s the tribe that women cut off their finger with each death of a family member; why always women

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This belief in the Dani tribe in Indonesia takes unusual stuff to an entire new level. The secretive tribe of the Dani found deep in the jungles of Indonesia.

When a family member dies, women from this clan have to endure real pain besides agonizing from personal sadness. And to do so, they cut off a part of their fingers.

This is apparently performed to ‘satisfy ancestral ghosts.’ Whatever that means. I marvel why do men not attend this custom? For sanity’s sake, this custom is rarely practiced now.

The demise of a family partner in the Dani tribe of Indonesia declares a vast amount of emotional and, for women, physical pain. Despite the unavoidable personal grief, women of the Dani tribe physically express that suffering by cutting off (by compulsion) a segment of one of their fingers.

Prior to being mutilated, the fingers are attached with a thread for thirty minutes to numb them. Once amputated, the new fingertips are burned to create new scar tissue.

This tradition, one of the world’s most shocking cultural exercises, is executed as a means to satisfy ancestral ghosts, and is rarely, but still continues to be taught in the tribe.

Whenever a treasured one passes on, female members of the tribe have the upper half of their fingers maimed, in a process called Ikipalin. This is performed as part of a ritual meant to ward off spirits. It is thought that peeling off the upper part of the finger helps to keep the departed person’s troubled spirit away from the family.

Also, it is implied to be an emblem of the pain of bereavement, and it doesn’t stop with adult women. In some cases, the mommies will chew the tips of the fingers off of their own newborns to have them take part in the exercise.

The Indonesian government outlawed fingertip removal, but members in Western New Guinea are determined to continue the practice. Older women are often found to be missing parts of their fingers, which suggests Ikipalin continues in some areas of the country

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